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Tag Archives: ask for help for grief

Remembering Baby Burton

Baby Burton died a year ago. Kateyanne Unullisi, a home funeral guide and funeral celebrant, tells the story of how his parents chose to use ceremony before and after his death, and to care for their son after he died, in their home.

A Day with Your Dead

Together at the edge of a sacred woods, in a beautiful barn loft above healing horses, we will connect deeply to our Ancestral Guides with deep journeying, art, and ceremony.

Being Held

May all of us find the courage to ask for help today. And help us to open in kindness to those who ask, or who are unable to ask. Perhaps the shortest and most powerful prayer in human language is help. Father Thomas Keating From August 15 entry in Mark Nepo’s The Book of Awakening  Continue Reading »

A Modern Home Funeral vs. a Traditional Funeral Home

Two men, one of them my husband, died at the same time in an accident. One was buried and all arrangements handled by a solid, decent, typical local funeral home. The other man was cremated in a simple cremation using greener approaches, after a family-directed funeral. This is one reason why I am passionate about a family’s choice to keep their loved one at home after a death, if that is right for them.

How to Become a Young Widow

“The story of my husband’s death is something people ask about a lot. I can’t tell it all of one blog, so we’ll take it in bits. Here, the story of how life turns course in a few hours.”

Toy Store Story: A Good Day to Die

“Thank you for helping them learn to pet your dog. We always had dogs but right now we don’t, and the kids really need the exposure.”

Luna Unullisi, Not Just any Dog

“She was a therapy dog before she got her official ‘Dr. Luna’ badge from Pet Partners, keeping me laughing when times got rough and sitting close when I needed comfort.”

Remember the Grievers, Save the World

“Why is it that we turn away from or stop attending to the Grievers?”

The What of What I Do

“I help families and loved ones cross a bridge that has always been pretty darn scary, when someone is dying or dies.”